Introducing Snap Shots from Snap.com!

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In my never ending quest to ensure that you have the best possible experience on my site, I decided to install a nice little tool called Snap Shots. It enhances links with visual previews of the destination sites, interactive excerpts of Wikipedia articles, display inline videos, RSS, MP3s, photos, stock charts and more.

Sometimes Snap Shots bring you the information you need, without your having to leave the site, while other times it lets you "look ahead," before deciding if you want to follow a link or not.

Should you decide this is not for you, just click the Options icon in the upper right corner of the Snap Shot and opt-out.

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Wednesday, April 30, 2008

LA Kings to Hike Ticket Prices Next Season

According to team president "Lucky" Luc Robitaille, the team has lost millions of dollars, even more than it lost before the lockout.

The Los Angeles Kings announced today that season ticket prices will increase 5.66% next season, though many of the cheapest seats will decrease in price by as much as 21%. Prices for individual game tickets for next season have not been announced yet.

This move was predictable and necessary for the team to keep pace with the rest of the league and be able to stay within the salary cap range. According to team president "Lucky" Luc Robitaille, the team has lost millions of dollars, even more than it lost before the lockout. This price hike will help the team hold the line on it's losses, while still keeping LA Kings tickets well below the league average price of $57, at $48.

I have to be honest though, even though I think it's the right move to increase ticket prices,

I disagree with the statement made by their Chief Marketing Officer, Chris McGowan, that it's better to increase prices a bit every year regardless of team performance

, as opposed to a huge price hike after a good year. Fans are often more incensed an grudging to part with their hard earned dollars after years of poor performance, even if it's less money than when the team wins. As you can see, teams who win can coax their fans to pay more money after good years, even if they don't like it. Never do you see a dominant team in a market that has had continuous success play in front of sparse crowds. Either way, this was the right move, as the price hike is not monumental.

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